The Mirasol project in Peru.

Today I went to To Damer to buy more Fabel to Peggy and Allena in US, and when I was going to leave May told me about that Mirasol had got there own yarn collection.

The yarn is beautiful just take a look at the photos:

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From left is Sulka 60% merino wool and 20% Alpaca & 20% silk, Hacho who is 100% hand dyed merino wool, Miski 100% Baby Llama.

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Here is the sample card of the colors😛

I just love the yarn and since I am crazy after hand dyed yarn the Hacho is gorgeous in the colors. I told May the owner of the store that tomorrow the Bergen Knitting Lady is coming to me, and that I was going to tell about the new yarn she had got. But you know, telling and feeling on the yarn are much better😛 so I got a skein with each type to show the ladys and also a color card samples. Guess who is going to have a fun time tomorrow🙂

Short about the Mirasol project: Mirasol is a young girl that shepard alpaca’s in Peru, Kari Hestness from Du store Alpakka in Norway meet Mirasol and here brother Alex when she visit Peru. For the whole story read here on Mirasolperu.

When I buy wool many of the suppliers stat that the animal are having the best care, yes that is very important. But for me it is also very important then I buy yarn it is of the Fair Trade idea, so with the Mirasol yarn I know that I support a good case.

I also hand dyed some yarn yesterday and are very pleased with the results:

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The colors are not quite correct on the red one, that is more orange/golden that is 100% hand spun angora. The other one has different shades of green and I am very satisfied with how it turned out, it is hand spun 50% angora, 25% silk and 25% merino. This yarn I am going to knit socks to my nephew Erik, it is a late birthday present.

3 thoughts on “The Mirasol project in Peru.

  1. Oh my, look what I caused!!!! 🙂 Those yarns look wonderful. It is very good to hear the story of the girl in Peru. I often wonder about people in villages working so hard to produce fiber, yarn or knitting goods to pay for their family to live. I wonder if they are working for very little money while here in the US we pay big prices for their goods. Make sense?

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